Teriyaki Restaurant Debuts in Clarkston | Business

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A former Hawaiian and his wife bring the food and culture from his former home in Clarkston to the Teriyaki Hut in Ho’okipa, a food trailer they opened in the parking lot of 360 Gymnastics, 1489 Poplar St.

One of the most popular dishes is a teriyaki chicken plate that sells for $ 8.50, said Albert Szakacs, who owns the business with his 14-year-old wife, Amy Szakacs.

The starter includes 6 to 8 ounces of chicken thigh meat marinated for three days in a sweet teriyaki, soy and ginger sauce, served over chopped cabbage with two scoops of sticky rice and a scoop of macaroni salad, a-t -he declares.

Drinks include bubble tea and crushed ice during the warmer months.

The company is open from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday to Friday. The schedule is subject to change, depending on what is happening with their three children, three stepchildren and three grandchildren. In addition, they can bring the company to special events in the future.

“It was so busy from the start,” he said. “The first day was amazing. We sold.

Customers eat the food at a picnic table, stand by the food trailer, in their cars, or take what they have ordered to eat elsewhere.

The opening of the Ho’okipa Teriyaki Hut is part of a significant lifestyle change for the Szakacs, who have carefully considered how to combine their talents with their business planning endeavor.

Before moving to the Lewiston-Clarkston Valley, he worked long hours as a chef for a chain of restaurants in the Nampa area.

This position was the most recent in a series of jobs during a 30-year career in the restaurant and hospitality industry, which also included work as a luau chef and banquet chef for Marriott.

She was a customer service retainer for AT&T and also worked at the front of the house in restaurants as a cashier and waitress.

They sold their house in southern Idaho. Then they invested what they did into the new business with the hope of having more control over their destiny and the ability to adjust their schedules to suit their family’s needs.

The company’s name, Ho’okipa, reflects this approach and the importance Szakacs place on the joy people derive from their family, friends and community. It means hospitality or generosity in Hawaiian.

“The more we laugh and love, the longer we live,” he said.

Lewiston Taco Bell will reopen at the end of September

Taco Bell plans to serve Mexican fast food at its Lewiston store on 21st Street by mid-September.

The location is temporarily closed while crews remodel its interior and exterior and replace furniture.

During the renovation, the Taco Bell a few miles away at 450 Bridge St. in Clarkston near Albertsons remains open.

The gym makes fitness more accessible in Genesee

GENESEE – Wanting to make exercise more convenient for the 1,050 residents of Genesee, a mother of two with a full-time job has opened a fitness center in the small town where she resides.

Genesee Fitness, at 141 W. Walnut St., gives its members 24-hour access with codes for exercise equipment such as ellipticals, treadmills, stationary bikes and weights, Megan said. Williams, who owns the business with her husband. , Tyler Williams.

“It is designed for people to create their own training system and learn new things according to their needs,” she said.

The gymnasium is open from 4:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. Monday and Wednesday, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. on Friday, from 8 a.m. to 9:30 a.m. on Saturday and from 4:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. on Sunday. Employees can register new members and answer questions about the machines during these hours.

Teenagers aged 13 to 15 can use the gym with their parents. Adolescents aged 16 and 17 can become members with the approval of their parents.

The cost is $ 55 per month per person and includes the use of a tanning bed. Discounts are available for families, teens, seniors, and those committing to multi-month subscriptions.

The opening of the fitness center comes less than a year after Williams gave up on her Lewiston gym membership she loved when she moved to Genesee.

Even though she likes to stay in shape, she’s found that she usually wouldn’t have time to drive 60 minutes round trip for a 30-minute workout between juggling her other responsibilities. Williams is an appeals specialist with Regence BlueShield of Idaho, a senior in the commerce program at Lewis-Clark State College and mother of two daughters. The youngest is in preschool and the oldest in high school.

So far, a number of townspeople have joined the gym, many of whom, like her, have busy schedules, she said. Among them are student-athletes who build strength or endurance for team sports, middle-aged adults who maintain fitness programs, and seniors who reinforce skills learned in physiotherapy.

“It is really important to me that our community feels at home when they are in the gym,” she said.

Elected officials preserve fiscal options for Lewiston port

Lewiston Port could require Nez Perce County taxpayers to contribute up to $ 550,000 for a capital project in a single year in the future without seeking approval from registered voters who live in the jurisdiction .

The option, called waived taxes, is available because of the state of Idaho rules governing how much tax districts like the port can receive.

Commissioners have kept the port’s annual share of property taxes at $ 405,000 for about 10 years, although they are allowed to increase it up to 3% each year without going to voters, port manager David said. Doeringsfeld at a recent harbor commission meeting.

When tax districts do not take the 3% increase, they are allowed to retain the right to claim what it would have generated at a later date, he said.

Previously this happened automatically, but last year the rules changed and the commission or elected officials of a tax district must now pass a resolution to have the power to recover the money in the future, he said. -he declares.

The harbor commissioners did not do so last year, but this year, at a recent harbor meeting, they added about $ 15,000 to the amount the harbor could receive from taxpayers in the future for projects to ‘fixed assets.

The Port of Lewiston now has about $ 550,000 it could add once for capital projects to what it would get in property taxes with its annual levy of $ 405,000, Doeringsfeld said.

Broadband extensions for telecommunications and a new wharf or crane are examples of ways the port could use the extra money, Doeringsfeld said.

If the project costs less than the amount available, the difference could be kept for a later date.

“We don’t know what circumstances might arise in the future,” Doeringsfeld said. “That way you have the option of using it.”

Rural Latah County town loses bank in fall

TROY, Idaho – Umpqua Bank is closing its branch at 424 S. Main St. in Troy on October 29.

Those with accounts at the financial institution are encouraged to do their banking through a mobile phone app, which offers the same personal experience offered by local locations, according to a letter Umpqua sent to customers about the closing.

“A financial expert (can) help you manage your money in real time, wherever you are, by text,” according to the letter. “From lost cards to home loans and savings plans, your dedicated banker is just a click away.

Umpqua’s Moscow branch will continue to operate at 609 S. Washington St.

Valley Vision elects its leaders

Troy Ledgerwood, President of the Credit Bureau of Lewiston-Clarkston, will chair Valley Vision for the year 2021-2022.

Other Valley Vision executives this year are Vice President, Michelle Bly, Vice President and Regional Director of TD&H Engineering; treasurer, Su Brown, retired accountant; and Secretary, Ann Watkins, Account Executive and Partner at Martin Insurance.

Their one-year term runs until early August 2022. Valley Vision is a non-profit economic development group supported by public and private funds.

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